eLetters

7 e-Letters

  • Re:The genes associated with a high risk of type 1 diabetes are becoming less common
    Wen-Peng You
    We thank colleagues for their critical comments that help to clarify relationships we have studied. We are not concerned with the frequency of what specific genes, high-risk or not, has increased recently. We are just making a general statement that with relaxed natural selection detrimental mutations may accumulate. The paper by Witas et al. cited by our critics uses the same rationale as we do when suggesting changes in type 1 d...
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  • The genes associated with a high risk of type 1 diabetes are becoming less common
    Sarah G Howard
    In the article, "Type 1 diabetes prevalence increasing globally and regionally: The role of natural selection and life expectancy at birth" (You and Henneberg 2016), the authors find a correlation between worldwide type 1 diabetes prevalence and both life expectancy at birth and the "Biological State Index" (Ibs), a measure of population reproductive success. Based on these findings, they argue that "the correlation of Ibs to the...
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  • Re:Nutty conclusion in walnut study
    Valentine Y. Njike

    We appreciate the attention to our manuscript[1].

    We will start by emphasizing that we cannot control what has been written in the media about this study. We will therefore limit our response to the reviewer's comments that directly pertain to our manuscript.

    The results of this study are clearly enumerated in the paper, with the supporting data shown in every instance[1]. We distinguish explicitly be...

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  • Nutty conclusion in walnut study
    Stephen L. Black

    Nutty conclusion in walnut study

    This study purports to show that eating walnuts lowers cholesterol level, a claim enthusiastically and uncritically repeated in the media (e.g."A handful of walnuts a day may help lower cholesterol:study", CTV News, November 25, 2015). Unfortunately, the claim is spurious, as the published data show no such effect.

    The study is well-controlled in including a randomized control group...

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  • Re:Nutty conclusion in walnut study
    Valentine Y. Njike

    We appreciate the attention to our manuscript[1].

    We will start by emphasizing that we cannot control what has been written in the media about this study. We will therefore limit our response to the reviewer's comments that directly pertain to our manuscript.

    The results of this study are clearly enumerated in the paper, with the supporting data shown in every instance[1]. We distinguish explicitly be...

    Show More
  • Nutty conclusion in walnut study
    Stephen L. Black

    Nutty conclusion in walnut study

    This study purports to show that eating walnuts lowers cholesterol level, a claim enthusiastically and uncritically repeated in the media (e.g."A handful of walnuts a day may help lower cholesterol:study", CTV News, November 25, 2015). Unfortunately, the claim is spurious, as the published data show no such effect.

    The study is well-controlled in including a randomized control group...

    Show More
  • Nutty conclusion in walnut study
    Stephen L. Black

    Nutty conclusion in walnut study

    This study purports to show that eating walnuts lowers cholesterol level, a claim enthusiastically and uncritically repeated in the media (e.g."A handful of walnuts a day may help lower cholesterol:study", CTV News, November 25, 2015). Unfortunately, the claim is spurious, as the published data show no such effect.

    The study is well-controlled in including a randomized control gro...

    Show More